Marc Williams
Marc Williams
Ethnobiologist Marc Williams has taught hundreds of classes and thousands of folks about plants, humans other life forms and their interface. His training includes a B.A. in Environmental Studies/Sustainable Agriculture and a M.A. in Appalachian Studies/Sustainable Development. He is the Executive director of Plants and Healers International and has spent over 16 years working at various restaurants, farms, and travels throughout 24 countries in North/Central America and Europe and all 50 of the United States.
We will talk about plants that address the heart specifically as well as heat, digestion, pain, muscle relaxation, inflammation, sleep, nervous system, stress, immunity, aromatherapy, stimulation, potential dangers, anaphrodisiacs,  and other factors that may help you get in the mood in a safe, healthy and good way.
Spend a class learning about trees and shrubs. We will go for a plant walk to learn how to identify a woody plant by the leaves, bark and other characteristics. Common and obscure uses for woody plants of the Appalachian flora that may support overall health, well-being and sustenance will also be discussed.
We will engage in a walk and talk around the site of Kinnection where we will witness the wonder of Spring and those plants that are flowering. Participants will reinforce plant identification skills by observing family patterns such as leaf, flower and fruit types. Uses including edibility, medicinality, craft, wildlife promotion and landscape beauty will be discussed.
Osker Brown
Osker Brown
Osker and his family manage Glorious Forest Farm in Madison county, where the goal is to re-establish humans as a responsible keystone species.  Osker works toward appropriate land management strategies that support vital ecosystems while meeting human needs.  This work involves deepening relationships with nutrient dense wild foods like hazelnut, acorn, hickory, and mullberry.  It also includes domestic animals as a management tool, and a means for harvesting less edible wild plants and turning them into milk and meat.
You are what you eat; 95% of the serotonin, and 50% of the dopamine, in your body are produced by your gut in direct reaction to your food.  These hormones are how your body determines what you should and should not do (ethics).  If you eat industrial foods, you will maintain the industrial infrastructure regardless of the ideas in your brain.  Wild foods provide higher densities of vitamins and minerals, while creating an impulse to perform the will of the forest.  We will give practical details on finding, gathering, storing, processing, and preparing acorns, hazelnuts, and mulberry leaves.  If time allows we will also give overviews of black walnuts, hickories, and chestnuts.
You are an attribute of your ecosystem.  The only chance for humans to become indigenous in southern appalachia is the restoration of the crucial ecotypes that allow for sustainable subsistence.  We will discuss ecological history of the region for the past ~13,000 years of human presence here and the reciprocal effects on ecosystem function.  We will then take a quick tour through some ancestral examples of European indigenous cultures.  To conclude, we will describe real world strategies for putting the puzzle pieces back together and fully integrating humans into this region.
Braden Trauth
Braden Trauth
Braden Trauth has been studying sustainability for 15 years now, exploring how we create a transition into a symbiotic culture with each other and our mother Earth. After studying sustainability around Europe and building and owning an Earthships he discovered Permaculture. He then went on to study with its originators, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren and many other leading names in the field which gave him the confidence to start training others in it 9 years ago. He has since trained well over 100 Certified Permaculturists, many of whom are doing amazing things from Cincinnati to Haiti. He is Board President of the Cincinnati Permaculture Institute and the City of Cincinnati’s Urban Agriculture Advisory Board and has taught permaculture at various places like the Haitian Ministry of Agriculture for USAID, The Earthship Academy and the University of Cincinnati. His spiritual journey has been just as important to him, empowering him to carry on the torch. Raised Catholic, he began to expand his perceptions and eventually traveled to India, Nepal and Tibet and then and then answered the call and became a student of Ram Dass, Neem Karoli Baba and eventuallySri Kaleshwar who he has studied with in India for many years now. All of these teachers hail from the hidden Indian Dattatreya/Avadhuta Tradition which includes such spiritual leaders as the Buddha, Jesus and Shirdi Sai Baba and students as diverse as Joseph Campbell, Steve Jobs and Ghandi. He continues to push his students towards spiritual awakening and then beyond the dogma into comprehensive spiritual awareness to help create the change and leadership needed on Earth currently.
Permaculture is laying the foundations of a sustainable future for a humanity that has learned to work with nature and heal the planet one yard, home and farm at a time. It has proven itself in diverse ecosystems and cultures around the globe and continues to expand its influence and impact through viral methods of dispersion. Come learn how you can plug into the evolutionary transition from baseline competitive survival to collectively realized conscious cooperation. You will walk away understanding the potentials that Permaculture has to offer and some fundamental steps to help you create your sustainable life to create our sustainable future.
Come to understand what religions, culture and the spiritual journey are for, why they are failing, and how we can evolve them to serve humanity & the planet again. Pulling from permaculture ethics, principles, and cultural & ecological connections, this workshop will take you on a journey into understanding the creation of a Symbiotic Culture. However, in order to succeed in this mission, it requires the creation of masters that can awaken humanity into one Global Family that is ecologically adapted and ethically motivated to set up systems that teach us how to heal and work with all beings and our Mother Earth for millennia to come. After all, we are Creators, “Created in the Likeness of the Creator.”
Lola Schewe
Lola Schewe
Lauren Barlag Schewe is a mama, home educator, herbalista and yoga instructor. She and her husband Ande own & operate Lola’s Botanicals, a herbal product line and Community Supported Herbalism share program in Milan, Indiana. Lauren has been studying herbs and nature connection for over a decade. Her journey started at Northern Arizona University studying Outdoor education and took her many to many vast and beautiful places exploring nature, meditation, cooking, herbalism and yoga. She completed her herbalist certification with Rosemary Gladstar and permaculture certification with This Land. Lauren has completed her 300 hr and 500 hr yoga certification through World Peace Yoga in Cincinnati, OH. Lauren’s approach to yoga, energy medicine, and herbalism is as a medium to heal and create an abundance of joy for all animals, people and the Earth.
From the forest to the fields, come explore what nature has to offer as food & medicine and experience a variety of herbal medicine-making techniques. Learn how herbal allies can help us to regain and maintain our health. Expand your creativity with your use of culinary cultivated herbs, as well as learn about wild and native herbs that bring nourishing traditions to your body, mind, & soul.
Ande Schewe
Ande Schewe
Ande Schewe is a permaculture designer artist and herbalist who lives in Milan, Indiana and owns Lola’s Botanicals with his wife Lola Lauren Barlag Schewe.  He has lead plant walks in the Ohio River Valley and the Midwest since 2001.   His educational background is a combination of Graphic Design, Natural Resources, Permaculture, and Botany. He has a passion for growing local foods, local superfoods, & herbs, and has operated his small family farm for over 9 seasons. He offers consultations, botanical surveys, and observational insight. He enjoys researching, educating, experimenting, and feeling seasonal diets & herbs.
Learn how to build/design a ecosystem with the human steward as an integral part. We will observe and talk about existing plants as well as edible, medicinal and companion plants in our temperate zone. Explore different methods and techniques used to implement forest gardens on different scales.
Tradd Cotter
Tradd Cotter
Tradd Cotter is a microbiologist, professional mycologist, and organic gardener, who has been tissue culturing, collecting native fungi in the Southeast, and cultivating both commercially and experimentally for more than twenty-two years. In 1996 he founded Mushroom Mountain, which he owns and operates with his wife, Olga, to explore applications for mushrooms in various industries and currently maintains over 200 species of fungi for food production, mycoremediation of environmental pollutants, and natural alternatives to chemical pesticides. His primary interest is in low-tech and no-tech cultivation strategies so that anyone can grow mushrooms on just about anything, anywhere in the world. Mushroom Mountain is currently expanding to 42,000 square feet of laboratory and research space near Greenville, South Carolina, to accommodate commercial production, as well as mycoremediation projects. Tradd, Olga, and their daughter, Heidi, live in Liberty, South Carolina.
Don’t have a lab? Don’t need one! Try some of these innovative techniques for cloning and expanding mushroom biomass to produce food, clean water, and create soil in just a few weeks. Perpetual systems for modular installations both at home and abroad, where fungal solutions are in great need.  This is a beginner to intermediate overview of everything you need to get started culturing and cultivating edible and medicinal mushrooms on a small or large scale.
Many species of edible fungi sweat powerful enzymes into the environment capable of molecular disassembly of complex molecules such as hydrocarbons, aromatic chlorinated compounds, and pesticides. Mushrooms native to your area of the U.S. are also well adapted to filter, stun and destroy pathogenic bacteria that accompany failing septic systems, manure holding ponds, and even pet waste runoff. Learn how these mushrooms perform these miraculous tasks and how to develop a living barrier or filtration system that is customized to fit your needs. Talk will focus on biomass expansion, site engineering, and species of mushrooms that can be used for mycoremediation projects.
J.D. Burnette
J.D. Burnette
J.D. has been adventuring within nature his whole life and a student of permaculture for four years, beginning with attending workshops on Aquaponics, to more recently attending both of the Permaculture Voices conferences. He is also a graduate of Geoff Lawton’s Online Permaculture Design Course and owner-operator of Farmstead Foodscapes, an urban farm in East TN.
This will begin with a presentation highlighting the core concepts behind holistic life-management, lasting approx. 45 min. There will be a 15-minute exercise in which participants will be asked to rapid-fire respond to tough questions. Sharing will be optional, as the next 15 minutes will be devoted to answering questions, and discussing how your findings can be put into application. If there is any ambiguity as to why you are here, what your mission is, or how you can get into action… then this is time you must find during your weekend at Kinnection Campout.
This will be discussion-based lecture where I introduce some simple tricks I’ve used gardening in East TN. From there, I will discuss scalable techniques that can be replicated to get you harvesting rain-water, growing food, or making compost on a shoestring budget in limited space, on your land or someone else’s.
Mateo Ryall
Mateo Ryall
I started the organic nursery Herb and Roots nursery in West Asheville , where I’m propagating hundreds of species of edible, medicinal and native plants, trees, shrubs , while regenerating ecosystems, habitats and species diversity .I’ve studied herbalism, permaculture design , & mushroom identification in the WNC area  and throughout  North America for the last two decades. My love of plants and mushrooms has guided me into a deeper appreciation of their healing modalities, which I integrate into my life, diet and medicine cabinet.
Also, I offer classes and internships in the nursery focused in plant propagation, plant and mushroom identification , and permaculture projects.
 In this class , I will describe the different medicinal uses of mushrooms that grow in the southern Appalachians. We will discuss the traditional benefits along with the current medical research into their uses The discussion will include a description of the various constituents of  mushrooms  and how these mycochemicals work physiologically in the body . While we also search for local species of mushrooms on site,I will explain the different types of relationships that mushrooms have with the soil and trees.
The focus of this class is to: 1) encourage participants to connect to plants using their sensory, intellect and energetic experience, 2) introduce the concept of plant ‘allies’ and 3) aid participants in recognizing common characteristics within the various medicinal plants families. We will step into the surrounding forests to observe, absorb and discuss how to build healthy and sustainable relations with plants based on tradition use, current scientific research, and personal exploration. I will describe ways in which the plant world has evolved through microscopic relationships between bacteria, fungi, plants and mammals, while emphasizing the symbiotic relationships that have grown from these unions and cohabitations that are essential for our existence.
Do you wonder what an antibiotic is, what it does in the body, or why it works? Do you understand the differences between Antiviral, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, or how to treat the different types of infections? Do you wonder why some herbs do not  work for different types of microbes but work against others, or why is giardia difficult to treat?
This class will explore the variety of different microscopic organisms that afflict humans regularly, which are some of the largest causes of illness and death to the human body. Learning how to differentiate symptoms based on the characteristics of their effects can empower herbalists to make less general remedies and treat the different pathogen with the optimal remedy that specifically works for each ailment or infection.
Josh Fox
Josh Fox
Fox has built a life around the healing powers of plants, people, and community. He weaves herbs, song, and acupuncture into his private healing practice, and writes music that uplifts the heart, honors his plant allies, and tickles the human spirit. With the same gentle, grounded nature he receives patients, he regularly holds group ceremony space around grief, heart-healing, and song-sharing. Find out more at: http://www.foxhealing.com/
We will use the power of voice, song, and community to open ourselves up and allow personal healing.
Fox brings the music and wisdom of the plants in the form of a musical journey. Original plant ballads, sing-a-longs, and ancient medicine songs will conjure to life the energetic magic of the local flora!
Chelsea Wakstein
Chelsea Wakstein
Chelsea lives in the Asheville area on Lovin Land, where she grows food, cooks up magical nourishment, ferments and preserves the bounty and regularly embraces the Earth in gratitude for the abundance. She feels most alive when she is dancing on the Earth, swimming and canoeing, singing her heart out, and feeding people. She’s the founder of Grateful Belly, a new mindful eating based events project that aims to nourish people deeply with meals focused on intention and gratitude.
A magical world of bacteria faeries live in our soil and on our bodies. Let us gather to learn about how we can cultivate healthy relationships with these bacteria faeries through making sauerkraut, hot sauce, and other vegetable based fermented foods. Learn to nourish your body’s ecology with food that’s alive!
The Earth gives us so much nourishment with every meal. Collecting humanure (yes, that’s your poop) is a great way to give back to the Earth, buiding soil and returning nutrients back to the Earth. Come learn how you can stop pooping in your water and start saying yes to building soil!

The Honey Bee Sanctuary
The Honey Bee Sanctuary
Tammy L. Linton has been a beekeeper for about 8 years and is the owner of Golden Spiral Apiary in Eastover, SC. At any given time, her farm is home to 10 to 30 colonies of bees.  Educating people about honey bees is one of her passions and she has given lessons to kids as young as 4 years old. This will be her third year sharing honey bee wisdom at Kinnection.
Kaat Byrd is a bit of a travelling beekeeper. With her home in the form of a backpack, she has spent the past four years working with various beekeepers all over while studying the philosophies and techniques of honeybee stewardship. She is exploring the idea that the bees do not need to be saved, rather freed from our old habits, conceptions, and paradigms. Kaat aims to bridge worlds through the bees and share seeds for thought.

The Honey Bee Sanctuary is a place for everyone to learn more about honey bees. People can peek inside a live bee colony with our observation hive, talk to real beekeepers, have samples of delicious honey and pollen, and learn lots of new things about bees and how they survive. The Honey Bee Sanctuary will be open daily from 10am to dusk. This year, we will offer three workshops, two Story Times, and aHoney Tasting. Each workshop will include a look inside a real live honey bee observation hive, samples of honey and/or bee pollen, and a time for questions and answers.

 

There will be two Honey Bee Story Times for Children. We will read two factual and fun picture books about the real lives of honey beesand/or beekeepers each session. While the books will be oriented towards children, adults are welcome to attend.
An array of different honeys will be available to try. We will explore the range of flavors and colors created by different nectar sources. There will be an assortment of varietal honeys, honeys from other countries and regions, and honeys from local sources to compare and contrast.
The Honey Bee Lore workshop will explore how people have perceived bees throughout history. The honey bee was, and is, considered sacred by many peoples and there are many ancient and modern legends surrounding bees and honey from around the globe.
In this workshop, we will discuss the differences between bees and wasps, and different kinds of bees. Topics will include their appearance and anatomy, food sources, pollination, reproduction, and social structure.
The History of Beekeeping workshop will delve into when and how we began to keep honey bees and will extend to the tasks of modern beekeepers. We will discuss how bees are kept, the tools of beekeeping, the processing of honey, and how apiculture has progressed through the centuries.